A Lucky horseshoe song

So much music in the world, so many different themes for songs … and now you’re about to learn about a horseshoe song!

Lucky horseshoe song

Gerry Guthrie

 


Video from Youtube

The Lucky Horseshoe

Performed by Gerry Guthrie, “The Lucky Horseshoe” is one of the most requested songs on Irish radio, and is finding its way around the world. According to Gerry’s manager, Henry McMahon, who penned the song, “In Ireland there is a tradition any girl getting married would be given an old horseshoe for good luck. When she and her husband would move into their new home, they would nail the horseshoe to a door for good luck. It had to be nailed in the upright position to keep all the good luck flowing towards them. Also, there were people who owned large farms of land (they were known as the Landed Gentry). As often happened the rich man’s daughter would fall in love with the young farm labourer, or in this case the blacksmith.”




“The Milbanke and Melbourne Families” by George Stubbs, c. 1769

History behind the song

The landed gentry consisted of people who owned land, either newly acquired or inherited. A newly rich man was expected not only to buy a country house and estate, but also to remove himself from his former business in order to avoid the “taint of trade.” Work was considered demeaning to the upper class. Over time, the gentry became increasingly associated with politics, military, and Parliament. In many cases, powerful “old families” held control over their local areas for generations. Until 1832, only landowners could vote. Mixing of the classes was frowned upon.



the lucky horseshoe
The CD is for sale at: Irishmusic.co.uk
a lucky horseshoe
A Lucky horsesoe

LYRICS

He walked into the Blacksmiths Forge,
A well-dressed man, his name was George,
He said ''Good Morning, Smithy, Just The Man I Want To See.
My daughter's pony threw a shoe, I was advised to come to you,
If you could replace it, I'll gladly pay your fee.”

His daughter brought the pony in. The blacksmith's eyes could not take in
The beauty of the lady standing by the door.
And when she smiled and said, ''Hello,'' deep in his heart he felt a glow.
That day the blacksmith's life was changed forever more.

Her father was a wealthy man, with many acres of fine land,
A twenty-two room mansion with a panoramic view.
I've heard it said that love is blind. He couldn't change his daughter's mind.
She fell in love with the blacksmith who made her pony’s shoe.

On the day that they were married, they rode in a horse-drawn carriage,
With four high-stepping ponies, two were black and two were grey, 
With seats of satin lining, the buckles that were shining,
But they couldn't match her beauty on her wedding day.

Well, now you heard the story of the blacksmith and the lady.
Some may think it's fiction, some may think it's true.
I've never been to a wedding, where among the gifts the bride will get,
Someone will always give her a lucky old horseshoe.



Powerscourt Estate
County Mayo

About Gerry Guthrie and Henry McMahon

Gerry Guthrie still lives in County Mayo, where he was born and raised. He began learning to play guitar at the age of eight. When he was old enough, he joined a group that played for lounge bars, weddings, dinner dances, and private functions. Accepting an invitation to play lead guitar with Sandy Kelly’s band, he then toured England and Scotland. He worked on the “The Patsy Cline Story” and “A Night At The Opry,” collaborating with George Hamilton IV, also known as “The International Ambassador of Country Music.” Gerry absorbed influences from numerous American country and Irish artists, and began recording in 2009. He played with other bands as well as solo, but his dream was to form his own country band. At a Jimmy Buckley dance, he met Henry McMahon, and the two immediately bonded, sharing their love of blending country and Irish styles. McMahon commented that “when I met him, I was amazed how much we had in common when it came to singers and songs…a good dance programme is the most important ingredient in our type of music.”



The horseshoe has definitely brought them both good luck!